Existence In The Frozen North, Canada’s Premiere Homemade Train Is The Pride Of Its Community

Existence In The Frozen North, Canada’s Premiere Homemade Train Is The Pride Of Its Community

The train adventure from Sept-Îles, a port on the north shore of the ferocious St Lawrence River in Canada, to Schefferville, a petit erstwhile mining town 355 miles north, is breathtaking. Premature in the expedition the train treads on the heels of meandering Moisie River.

Pine engulfed mountains plunged craggily into the valley. A vast amount of dark blue water is yet covered in ice and snow even in May. Then the landscape becomes flatter and train covers slim lakes that sprint northwest across the Labrador plateau like oil on water. Under the grey sky the landscape is still. Under the blue gleamingly white.

The journey is not that swift. Around 13 and 15 hours are disbursed on this train. Hunting and fishing groups are dispensed. Mine workers debark at camps alongside the tracks.  At Emeril Junction, mile 224.5, the Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway (QNS&L) driver exchanges with one from Tshiuetin Rail Transportation. Tshiuetin North America’s premiere native possesses rail company indicates wind of the north in Innu, a local language spoken in northeastern Quebec and Labrador. Its driver expands the train’s tempo from an unrushed 40mph to a breezy 45mph.

Gradual it may be but Tshiuetin is of unparalleled significance to the three First Nations that own it, the Innu from Uashat Mak Mani-Utenam, the Innu of Matimekush-Lac John, and the Naskapi of Kawawachikamach. There are the employment they offer.

Share this post